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Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Russia's Putin might be going going going - but the resulting vortex drains into a dangerous void

"..the intrusions (from Russia) have become so probing, that Russian hackers have even gained 'carte blanche access' to portions of the White House and State Department servers, including portions of the White House and State Department servers including 'access to the president's private schedule'."

Although I'm not any kind of an authority on, or about, Russia, my father's ancestry, coupled with common sense, tells me there's serious trouble brewing for Putin.  But he won't be done in without causing horrible turmoil.

Nevertheless, Putin is still capable of causing enormous discord, even as his leadership is pulled into an international vortex, leading to the black hole of his extinction.

Meanwhile, Russia's impending leadership implosion is terrible news for the world.

Here's what we know:

1. Russians are living under Putin's authoritarian rule. Opposition leader Boris Nemtsov's assassination was a warning shot for the entire nation. Don't oppose Putin. If you do, prepare to be as dead as the assassinated Nemtsov or poisioned with nuclear toxins like Alexander Litvinenko.

2.  Russia's ruble is worthless. Although some oligarchs prop up the Russian national currency, the bottom line is, the currency is useless. As global oil prices plummet, the ruble becomes buried in the lost revenues.

3.  Meanwhile, the US is engaged in a secret war with Russia, reports Ben Branstetter in DailyDot.com.  "...the latest in a long chain of attacks by Russia against the United States, a problem so severe President Barack Obama issued an executive order giving the Treasury Department official capacity to sanction any participator in such an attack, a similar punishment currently being levied against North Korea after their suspected involvement in the notorious hack against Sony Pictures last fall.

Despite constant threats from China, North Korea, and a myriad of other nations and private groups, breaches by Russia or Russian interests of American institutions of power is a common enough and serious enough concern that it should be treated, not as the vague capabilities of a former enemy, but as direct attacks by a current enemy, a cyberwar in the most literal sense of the term.


The U.S. is the top target of cyberattacks in the world and faces a variety of enemies, but the regularity with which massive piles of sensitive data are leaked onto Russian black markets speaks not to the devotion of a criminal element but to the apathy of the Russian government. The threats coming from within Putin’s country are far from rare—in fact, they are ongoing. The sanctity of everything from government communications to the financial markets is at stake and it is well past time to take it seriously.

"American's secret war with Russian has already started", writes Branstetter.  "It may not make the news most of the time, but 'vital components of the U.S. government and the national economy' are now under daily attack from Russian cyber criminals who enjoy the Kremlin's tacit support." 

In the midst of this uncertainty, President Putin must be feeling the pressure of Washington DC retaliation and his own internal insecurities. After all, in spite of Putin's delusional Napoleonic ambitions, he's just another power hungry human being who's as mortal as all who came before him.  

Unfortunately, just like all who came before him, like Attila the Hun, Napoleon, Hitler and Mussolini, Putin will cause an enormous amount of destruction before he falls into the black hole leadership vortex towards his extinction.

Meanwhile, the world is at the brink of a Middle East World War, while Russia works behind the scenes, engaging in power games and assaulting the US with dangerous cyber security attacks.  

It's hard to decide how to deal with Russia, when Putin uses cat and mouse diplomacy and cyber wars are assaulting US security. America must put in place an international alliance of leaders who are of one mind about how to protect the world against Putin, who will likely become unstable as he enters the demise of his mortal vortex.  

Moscow Times has reported, in the past, how Russia was potentially headed toward another Revolution, as a result of Putin's aggressive leadership. Well, the uncertainty of the value of the Russian ruble, plus Putin's desperation, might push the people to eventually remove him from power.  Maybe.  Maybe not. 

Nevertheless, Putin's mortality is the only given in the choices of how to deal with the growing war with Russia.  

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