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Friday, June 14, 2013

Defending the Syrian Rebels: Iran Behind the Curtain


Let's face it, Iran is the enemy complicit in the Syrian government's atrocities toward the rebels.  Likewise, Iran is certainly a long standing source of angst against America. Potentially, it's about time we confront Iran, once and for all, as their anti-American intentions have been evident since 1979, with the take over of the US Embassy in Tehran, a situation described in the Academy Award winning movie, "Argo".

Although I sadly admit to being reticent about assisting any side in
the bloody Syrian civil war, it seems like America's involvement is now inevitable.  

Human carnage of unimaginable proportions must be stopped.  

The Syrian civil war is an ongoing armed conflict between forces loyal to the Syrian Ba'ath Party government and those seeking to oust it. The conflict began on 15 March 2011, with popular demonstrations that grew nationwide and forced a humanitarian catastrophe. 

Anti-government demonstrations were part of the wider Middle Eastern protest movement known as the Arab Spring. Protesters demanded the resignation of President Bashar al-Assad, whose family has held the presidency in Syria since 1971, as well as the end of Ba'ath Party rule.  And the bloodshed continues.
Sadly, the anti-government rebels have endured tens of thousands of deaths and both side report enormous losses.  Civilians are bearing the brunt of the fighting.  As many as 92,000 people have died and the number is climbing, reports The New York Times. More than 5,000 deaths are reported every month.

It's entirely likely this devastating conflict will grow, yet again, when the US in openly involved.  American military aid will support the anti-government rebels, but our participation, also, will put our nation in direct confrontation with Iran. This is because Syria and Iran are strategic allies.  Fighting Syria means confronting Iran.  Moreover, due to the nuclear pressure Iran is exerting on Middle East security, it's, probably, just a matter of time until armed engagement with the US becomes a reality.  

Therefore, the US might as well engage with Iran through assistance to anti-government rebels in Syria. This tactic makes military sense because, apparently, Iran is already supporting the pro-government forces. When the US provides military assistance to the Syrian rebels, the aid can enhance our ability to keep Iran's military tactics under closer surveillance.

Defending the Syrian Rebels, in my opinion, is an American armed confrontation with Iran, whereby President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is the evil intended leader who lurks behind the military curtain of Syrian President Assad's army.  

Although Senator John McCain (R-AZ) has called for military assistance to support the Syrian rebels for a long time, his clarion call has fallen flat with war weary Americans.  

Clearly, America don't have enough money to sustain another war, especially on the heels of the Iraq and Afghanistan military campaigns.  (Where's the Tea-Party on the Syrian appropriations?)

Perhaps, this confrontation with Syria is a delayed reaction to the retaliation we should have initiated against Iran, but didn't, following the 1979 hostage crisis.  Iran had absolutely no right, whatsoever, to allow a take over of our US embassy in Tehran, where Americans were held hostage for 444 days, terrorized by the threat of death by firing squad. Indeed, it's probably time to hold Iran accountable for illegally holding Americans hostage for no reason, even 44 years after the event.

Obviously, the world cannot stand by and ignore the massive genocide in Syria, regardless of who is the "real" enemy.

But, a war weary American public might be inclined to support our engagement in Syria if we are better informed about who the "real" enemy is behind the curtain.  In spite of the massive number of casualties, the real enemy to be confronted, the evil behind the curtain, is Iran.

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