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Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Climate Change and Poverty- from Catholics Confront Global Poverty


"THE TIME IS NOW Climate change affects everyone. And in the United States, we have incredible power to encourage change through our elected officials. As people of faith, we have a responsibility to speak out with and on behalf of our brothers and sisters impacted by the changing climate."- Catholics Confront Gobal Poverty.If We Were Just 100 People, This Is Where We’d Live

I've lived in a developing country, the Phillipines, where people went ot the market to buy one leaf of cabbage, or one egg at a time. It's beyond heartbreaking. There are plenty of people in the world who can create a meal oout of a leaf of cabbage and one egg, and a village could feast on the food I throw away during any one week.

An article in Catholics Confront Global Poverty brings more social awareness to the plight of the poor especially as climate change is impacting food production.

Marta Barrera awakens abruptly—not from the sounds of her six children, but from a pounding rain she hears on her thatched roof. She shakes her husband and rises quickly … only to realize that the sound was a dream. She shakes her head and frowns. The family needs the precious rain for their corn crop, cistern and daily living. Marta and her husband, Hugo, are Guatemalan farmers whose livelihood has been severely impacted by a monthslong drought. Like thousands of Central American farmers, they are experiencing the negative consequences of climate change in their work, family and community. “Our partners and the farmers we work with in the developing world are experiencing the effects of climate change now—and we can’t wait to help them adapt,” says Joan Rosenhauer, CRS vice president for U.S. Operations. “It’s a matter of survival.” Today, Marta and Hugo are part of a CRS agriculture program that is helping them learn how to enhance soil health and grow drought-resistant native crops. They’ll have a future with opportunity, even as the dry conditions continue. The pace of climate change has dramatically escalated in recent years. And the poor and most vulnerable are living with the consequences. In an interdependent world, the health of our environment cannot be separated from the well-being of our neighbor. Taking good care of our planet is necessary for the Earth to thrive as God intended. UNPRECEDENTED GLOBAL ACTION In December 2015, presidents, heads of state, prime ministers and others met in Paris to discuss the environmental impacts we are collectively responsible for. At this meeting, the 21st Conference of the Parties —or COP21—196 countries agreed to invest in green energy, while lessening dependence on fossil fuels. Recognizing their “common but differentiated” responsibilities, the United States and many other countries agreed to help countries struggling with crippling poverty and the impacts of climate change through the Green Climate Fund. WORKING TOGETHER Catholics Confront Global Poverty is part of a large group of Catholic organizations that support care for creation. 

Our prayers and actions make a difference in the lives of our brothers and sisters impacted by climate change throughout the world. Partners include the Catholic Climate Covenant, Catholic Rural Life, National Federation for Catholic Youth Ministry, and the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities.

MORAL ISSUES ARE CONCERNS THAT AFFECT THE HUMAN FAMILY. CATHOLICS—LIKE EVERYBODY ELSE—WE CARE ABOUT CREATION AND THE GIFTS OF THE EARTH, THAT THEY ARE TAKEN CARE OF AND AVAILABLE TO ALL PEOPLE. IN OUR VIEW, AND CERTAINLY IN THE POPE’S VIEW, THAT’S WHY THIS IS A MORAL ISSUE: CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS THE VERY THINGS THAT KEEP PEOPLE ALIVE AND HELP PEOPLE PROSPER.’ —DAN MISLEH, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CATHOLIC COVENANT ON CLIMATE CHANGE.

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