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Sunday, May 10, 2015

ISIS an insidiously growing evil in our midst

Americans are eternal optimists. That's one reason why we were blindsided by the horrific September 11, 2001 attacks on our nation by Osama Bin Laden and the Taliban.  We just didn't expect it.

Now, we're faced with the potential for another evil ISIS attack on our nation. How did all of this evil permeate our nation's borders?

I'm completely mystified about how Osama bin Laden took a particular hatred towards America. Is seems to me, he was a man of some independent means. He was born into a well connected Saudi Arabian family. American didn't do anything of particular significance to cause his hatred to become so incensed that he had delusions of grandeur about taking over the world.  Obviously, Bin Laden was infused with a strange euphoric evil.

Post the Osama bin Laden brazen assassination by the Navy Seal Team 6, on May 2, 2011, there were other splinter groups, like the evil Islamic State or ISIS, that began to claim a sort of mob revenge.  

Now, instead of the Osama bin Laden Taliban being America's enemy, it's the amorphous evil ISIS group that's declared an end to civilization, as we know it. In their jihad plan, the United States is ground zero in the group's horrific quest to destroy humanity.  

American patriotism is roused to combat the evil intentions of ISIS. Nevertheless, for some unknown numbers of sympathizers, it seems the insidious social networking communications, conducted 24/7 by the Islamic terrorist group, are unbelievably attracting militant followers in the US.

Even worse, there's enough chatter from weird communications networks to lead domestic security organizations to believe an ISIS threat on the US is inevitable.  Of course, in the philosophical realm, the possibility of an ISIS  motivated attack on the US is certainly a potential reality. Except, with the attack of a free speech program in Texas by two, now dead, ISIS militant sympathizers, the concept of another copy cat attack seems even more likely.

CNN reports that the United States is "certainly vulnerable" to becoming a new front line in the fight against ISIS, reported by Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson on Sunday.

Johnson chairs the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. He told CNN's Jim Sciutto on "State of the Union" Sunday that attacks inspired by ISIS, like one against a provocative cartoon contest in Texas a week ago, are allowing the group to convey a "winner's message."

"The best strategy the U.S. can employ to defeat this is actually defeat ISIS in Iraq and Syria so that the reality is conveyed that this is not a winning organization, it is a losing organization," he said.

In other words, defeat ISIS where they live, in the Middle East.

Although this strategy, outlined by Senator Johnson, makes sense because it keeps ISIS contained, the fact is, there are obviously ISIS sympathizers here in the US.  In my opinion, this is evident by the visible fact that few, if any, Muslims are organized to combat the ISIS messaging.

It's impossible to understand why extremist Islamic groups like ISIS and splinters of the Taliban are determined to destroy civilization. Moreover, it's tragic to realize how the US is a ground zero target for the evil these zealous groups permeate among their wrong minded followers.

Nevertheless, the reality is that the evil ISIS absolutely exists and, because of the group's anhilistic intentions, they must be eradicated.

Unfortunately, I don't think fighting ISIS in Syria and Iraq will do the job. American Muslims must organize to denounce the intentions of Islamic extremist groups. Moreover they must do something soon. Otherwise, in my opinion, by maintaining their mysterious sociological reticence, the American Muslims are appearing to be complicit in the intentions of an evil that civilized people are totally unable to fathom. Consequently, our collective response, over time, is becoming less and less measured.

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